Craigellachie 33YR 750ML


Craigellachie (pronounced kray-GAL-eh-kee) does a few things in production that gives its Scotch a signature meaty quality and “muscularity,” as the company likes to put it. Firstly, Craigellachie uses worm tubs during distillation. Where most distilleries prefer shell and tube condensers, which expose the alcohol to far more copper, Craigellachie’s worm tubs minimize copper contact. That means more sulfur retention once the alcohol vapor is transformed back into liquid. It’s the residual sulfur that produces the Scotch’s meaty, muscular core, putting it in a heavier weight class than your typical Speyside spirit. There are only a handful of distilleries left that still use worm tubs.

But before distillation, Craigellachie oil-fires its barley in the kiln during the malting process. This also adds to the Scotch’s robust character.

It also spent more than three decades in Bourbon hogshead barrels and Sherry casks. Exact time frames are a trade secret, but nevertheless, what’s left is a quirky, delicious Scotch that has plenty of cerebral refinement to balance out its brawn. Specifically, some sweeter elements of tropical fruit, marzipan and honey. And then there’s that distant smoky note of an autumnal bonfire in the background.

$3,929.00

Sidewalk Spirits



Craigellachie (pronounced kray-GAL-eh-kee) does a few things in production that gives its Scotch a signature meaty quality and “muscularity,” as the company likes to put it. Firstly, Craigellachie uses worm tubs during distillation. Where most distilleries prefer shell and tube condensers, which expose the alcohol to far more copper, Craigellachie’s worm tubs minimize copper contact. That means more sulfur retention once the alcohol vapor is transformed back into liquid. It’s the residual sulfur that produces the Scotch’s meaty, muscular core, putting it in a heavier weight class than your typical Speyside spirit. There are only a handful of distilleries left that still use worm tubs.

But before distillation, Craigellachie oil-fires its barley in the kiln during the malting process. This also adds to the Scotch’s robust character.

It also spent more than three decades in Bourbon hogshead barrels and Sherry casks. Exact time frames are a trade secret, but nevertheless, what’s left is a quirky, delicious Scotch that has plenty of cerebral refinement to balance out its brawn. Specifically, some sweeter elements of tropical fruit, marzipan and honey. And then there’s that distant smoky note of an autumnal bonfire in the background.

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